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Sermon for Third Sunday After Trinity, 2022

My sermon for the Third Sunday After Trinity, 3 July, 2022, at St. Luke's Anglican Church, Blue Ridge, GA.  The sermon is about 20 minutes in, if you wish to view it.

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